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Arts & Entertainment - page 4

The Arts & Entertainment world is a many-splendoured thing in Western Mass, Southern VT, and North Eastern NY. What are you're interested in? Send an e-mail to arts@greylockglass.com.

Bask in Arts and Outdoors this week in Northern Berkshires

Winter trails on the grounds of the Clark Art Institute are open for the exploring; photo by Sara Farrell Okamura.
Winter trails at the Clark Art Institute are open for the exploring; photo by Sara Farrell Okamura.

It is the end of January. The sky is an opaque slate grey. Temperatures are sinking into minus territory, not counting wind chill factor. What should you do to fight mid-winter inertia? Go out! There are lots of amazing activities to do in Northern Berkshires from snowshoeing at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown to free day at MASS MoCA in North Adams to exhibits that just opened this month. Check the notices below; you will begin to see the light.

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Possible Selves:
Queer Foto Vernaculars

Possible Selves: Queer Foto Vernaculars, on view at the Williams College Museum of Art now through April 14; photo of installation by Brad Wakoff.
Possible Selves: Queer Foto Vernaculars, on view at the Williams College Museum of Art now through April 14; photo of installation by Brad Wakoff.

Possible Selves is one of the most critical contemporary exhibitions documenting the global impact of queer identities through portrait photography over a 60-year period.

This exhibition is the brainchild of gifted assistant curator at Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), Dr. Horace Ballard. The exhibition consists of selections from WCMA’s collection of legendary queer artists including Andy Warhol, Robert Mapplethrope, Andres Serrano, Felix Gonzalez Torres, and Nan Goldin to name a few, plus over 200 images selected from Instagram.

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Environmentally radical views of Turner & Constable

“Rockets And Blue Lights (Close At Hand) To Warn Steamboats Of Shoal Water,” Joseph Mallord William Turner, English, 1775–1851; 1840, Oil on canvas; Acquired by Sterling and Francine Clark, 1932
“Rockets And Blue Lights (Close At Hand) To Warn Steamboats Of Shoal Water,” Joseph Mallord William Turner, English, 1775–1851; 1840, Oil on canvas; Acquired by Sterling and Francine Clark, 1932

“The sun is God”

— (attributed to) J.M.W. Turner 

Yes! Turner & Constable, 19th century artists, present two environmentally progressive perspectives of the natural world on view at the Clark Art Institute. The exhibit, Turner & Constable: The Inhabited Landscape, compares and contrasts two entirely different styles of painting that both elevated the genre of landscape painting beyond historical and mythological works while recognizing the invincibility of nature and our intrinsic human dependency upon it. Keep Reading

Free! Sometimes with Benefits!

"The Maples," created by Natalie Jeremijenko; photo by Beyond My Ken (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons Tree-mancipation Day!
"The Maples," created by Natalie Jeremijenko; photo by By Beyond My Ken via Wikimedia Commons

No doubt about it, museums are expensive. In the Berkshires we live in an area where culture is a primary industry and museums are a major segment of that industry. Everyone tells us, from healthcare professionals to educators, that art is great for you and your family—and it is. But…how can you participate or be part of this community if you can’t visit these institutions?

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Time is running out!
Don’t be left out in the cold!

Don’t Be Embarrassed! But…

Michael Himbeault [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Michael Himbeault [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

All good exhibits and productions have to end sometime. Maybe they’re going on tour to spread wonder and admiration across the country or the world (either objects of art or thespians). Maybe they’re being crated up and shipped back to from wherever they were on loan (More the art than the performers). Maybe they’re being returned to captivity in a private collection after enjoying a brief public outing (we really hope we’re talking about just the artwork, here…)

No matter the reason, when that show closing date starts drawing near, you’d best be making excuses for lots of other things in your life that you’re going to have to beg off. It is NOT unthinkable that you might miss a once in a lifetime chance if you blink. The Greylock Glass is here to help you avoid massive regret with your reminder of what’s soon to pass. Or at least pass through and on their way to another destination.

— The Editors

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Will Call #70: Love’s Labour’s perfectly Lost at The Dell.

From left: Luke Haskell, Dara Silverman, Madeleine Rose Maggio; photo By Eloy Garcia.
From left: Luke Haskell, Dara Silverman, Madeleine Rose Maggio; photo By Eloy Garcia.

(Cover Photo) From left: Luke Haskell, Dara Silverman, Madeleine Rose Maggio; photo By Eloy Garcia.

Lenox, Mass. — Shakespeare & Company presents William Shakespeare’s comedy Love’s Labor’s Lost, directed by Kelly Galvin and performed outside in The Dell at The Mount, Edith Wharton’s Home. This family-friendly, open-air production featuring Shakespeare & Company Education Artists runs from July 10th – August 18th.

Today is Monday, August 13 and you’re listening to Episode #70 of Will Call.

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TLC #63—We catch up, then cross the line to cover the Poor People’s Campaign

Lt. Gov. candidate Quentin Palfrey, poet Clarrisa Sacherski, Northeast Fiddlers’ Convention, mystery author Chris Wondoloski, The Poor People’s Campaign

Welcome, Greylock Nation, to episode #63 of the Top Left Corner here at the Greylock Glass. We’ll hear more from Carrisa later in the show, and if you behave, I’ll even treat you to one of her recent poems she was kind enough to record and share with us.

A no-foolin'-around sized force of City of Albany and New York State Capitol police was on hand at the June 4 Poor People's Campaign event. Some twenty-seven arrests were made for trespassing and disturbing the peace; photo by Jason Velázquez.
A no-foolin’-around sized force of City of Albany and New York State Capitol police was on hand at the June 4 Poor People’s Campaign event. Some twenty-seven arrests were made for trespassing and disturbing the peace; photo by Jason Velázquez.

We have a pretty sizable show for you this week. Guests include candidate for Lt. Governor, Quentin Palfrey, Poetess Carissa Sacherski, author Chris Wondoloski, organizer of the first ever Northeast Fiddlers’ Convention Jim Wright, AND special coverage of the June 4 Poor People’s Campaign rally and action in Albany, including speaking with North County activists Sam Smith and Reverend Mark Longhurst, Poor People’s Campaign- NY organizer Barbara Smith, and Vocal-NY staff member G.G. Morgan. Keep Reading

Will Call #69: Purple Valley Plays—A Festival of New Work for the Stage

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — The Williams Theatre Department will present Purple Valley Plays, original works for the stage written, directed, designed, and performed by Williams students. Back for a third year, Purple Valley Plays continues the Theatre Department’s tradition of incubating new work and cultivating the next generation of theatre artists. Presented in two programs, Purple Valley Plays will premiere works by Terah Ehigiator ’18, Mia Hull ’17, Joseph Messer ’21, Chanel Palmer ’19, and Tom Robertshaw ’19. *

Performances are on Thursday, April 26th to Saturday, April 28th. Program 1 will be in the CenterStage at 7 PM. Program 2 will be in the Adams Memorial Theatre at 8:30 PM. All performances will be located at 1000 Main Street, in Williamstown, MA. Tickets are $3.

“The Theatre Department recognizes that some artistic works are provocative, and may be challenging for audience members—emotionally, intellectually, and personally.  We wish to alert our patrons to the following specific content.”

 

Program One (Adams Memorial Theatre)

River Spirits by Terah Ehigiator ’18, directed by Jack Romans ’20. Emmett lives freely in paradise until the appearance of a strange new boy alters him forever. With playfulness and sincerity, this play explores tensions of boyhood, friendship, and (dis)belief.

contains artistic representations of racialized violence and self-harm.

Phaedra / Hippolytus / by Mia Hull ’17, directed by Tom Robertshaw ’19. A woman, in love with her husband, falls in love with his son. Clean lines and floors, stifled, enraged, undone.

contains artistic representations of suicide.

Program Two (CenterStage)

Majesty in the Middle Realm by Chanel Palmer ’19, directed by Caroline Fairweather ’20. A fast-paced exploration of connection, belonging, displacement, and infinity. A young woman’s quest for family and for peace in a world of in-betweens turns out to extend well beyond her wildest dreams.

alludes to racialized violence and police brutality.

What if We Loved with our Radiated Bodies? by Joseph Messer ’21, directed by Fiona Selmi ’21. Three infected lovers attempt to find themselves, but as their environment falls apart, words fall apart, movement falls apart, and people fall apart as well.

contains graphic sexual language.

Chastens and Hastens by Tom Robertshaw ’19, directed by Liam Ouweleen ’19. Thanksgiving/family/generations/breach/a dongle/butterball/ritual hunt?

references appropriation of indigenous cultures, and ignorance about sexual and gendered orientations.

The Theatre Department works to develop in each student an understanding of theatre that is both broad and deep. Through creative expression and critical study, we challenge students to engage both contemporary and historical modes of performance. Theatre students make artworks through design, acting, directing, and dramaturgy. They are encouraged to experiment, to risk, and to make bold choices. Working collaboratively with faculty and guest artists, students integrate intellectual, physical, and emotional responses into an array of live performances each academic year.

For tickets, visit the Williams ’62 Center Box Office Tues-Sat, 1-5 pm or call (413) 597-2425. For more information, please visit http://62center.williams.edu

 

* This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

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