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Winter Storm Warning
...winter Storm Warning Remains In Effect From 4 Pm Saturday To 4 Pm Est Sunday... * What...heavy Snow Expected. Total Snow Accumulations Of 12 To 20 Inches. Some Snow Totals Across The Southern Green Mountains In Southern Vermont May Approach 2 Feet. Winds Will Gust To 20 To 30 Mph Sunday Afternoon. ...Read More.
Effective: January 19, 2019 at 4:00pmExpires: January 20, 2019 at 4:00pmTarget Area: Northern Berkshire; Southern Berkshire

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WRLF announces its Sheep to Shawl Festival

On Saturday May 5th from 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM the Williamstown Rural Lands Foundation will host a Sheep to Shawl Festival at its Sheep Hill headquarters in Williamstown. *

Shepherds Kristen Whittle and Denise Leonard will demonstrate herding sheep up and around the steep meadows of Sheep Hill using their skilled border collies.
Shepherds Kristen Whittle and Denise Leonard will demonstrate herding sheep up and around the steep meadows of Sheep Hill using their skilled border collies; submitted photo.

The Sheep to Shawl festival is a celebration of spring and New England heritage, with local artisans and food producers, farm animals, and a focus on the region’s historic fleece and fiber industry. The legendary Fred DePaul will spin stories while shearing sheep with traditional tools. Shepherds Kristen Whittle and Denise Leonard will demonstrate herding sheep up and around the steep meadows of Sheep Hill using their skilled border collies. Local farms will bring sheep and small farm animals along with delicious home-grown and locally produced products for tasting and purchasing.

The Green Mountain Weavers & Spinners Guild will demonstrate carding, spinning, and weaving throughout the day. Blacksmithing and traditional building techniques will also be showcased. There will be fiber-arts and crafts projects for children and enthusiastic adults. Local farmers and artisans will show and sell their wares, including basketry, hand-made wearable items, jewelry, maple syrup, pastured meats, and fiber products.

Cricket Creek Farm and the Store at Five Corners will offer, artisanal cheeses, fresh baked goods, sandwiches and other delicious edibles available for purchase.

Admission is $7 per individual, $12 per family and $5 per individual and $10 per family for WRLF members. Those who come by bicycle get in free! Become a WRLF member at the gate and receive free admission! All are welcome to enter their admission tickets in a Sheep to Shawl raffle for a ‘locally produced’ prize basket. Proceeds from the Sheep to Shawl Festival support the Williamstown Rural Lands Foundation (www.wrlf.org) and its public programming.

The Williamstown Rural Lands Foundation is a non-profit, member-supported land conservation trust working to preserve the rural New England character of the north Berkshire region. It offers programs in natural and cultural history year-round at Sheep Hill and other conservation properties. Sheep Hill is located on Route 7 approximately one mile south of the Williamstown rotary. Look for the sign on the west side of the road.

For more information, visit our website at www.wrlf.org or call Sheep Hill at 413-458-2494. WRLF is grateful for the support of Nature’s Closet for underwriting this event.

 

* This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

MCLA to host middle school science fair this Friday

The 12th Annual Massachusetts Region 1 Middle School Science and Engineering Fair will be held Friday, April 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the campus’s Amsler Campus Center gymnasium.
The 12th Annual Massachusetts Region 1 Middle School Science and Engineering Fair will be held Friday, April 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the campus’s Amsler Campus Center gymnasium.

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. – Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) will host the 12th Annual Massachusetts Region 1 Middle School Science and Engineering Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, April 27, in the campus’s Amsler Campus Center gymnasium. *

The 12th Annual Massachusetts Region 1 Middle School Science and Engineering Fair will be held Friday, April 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the campus’s Amsler Campus Center gymnasium.
The 12th Annual Massachusetts Region 1 Middle School Science and Engineering Fair will be held Friday, April 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the campus’s Amsler Campus Center gymnasium; public domain photo.

The event is free and open to the public from 1 to 3 p.m. This year’s keynote speaker will be Paul Reynolds, a children’s book author who also is the co-founder of FableVision and the Reynolds Center for Teaching, Learning, and Creativity with his twin brother, Peter Reynolds. He will speak to students at 1:45 p.m. in the Amsler Campus Center gym.

About 150 middle school students from Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, and Hampshire counties will gather to present their research projects to a panel of judges. The top 40 students will qualify for the state competition at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester on Saturday, June 2, and the top 10 percent of the finalists may submit their work to the Broadcom Masters Competition.

More than 30 judges will assess their projects in the areas of biology, behavioral and social science, chemistry, computer science, earth and space science, engineering, environmental science, mathematics and physics. The students’ projects will be judged on several criteria, including scientific approach, innovation and creativity and presentation.

According to MCLA’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program manager, Shannon M. Zayac, the Fair creates a connection between higher education, K-12, local business and non-profit agencies, and helps build student awareness and interest in the pursuit of post-secondary degrees or careers in STEM areas.

At FableVision, Reynolds presides over a growing team of media design, technology and research specialists. He has helped to build the multimillion dollar firm into an internationally recognized multimedia developer and publisher, with partnerships, strategic alliances and clients across numerous industries, including broadcast, museum, institutional, K-12, educational publishing, technology, and research.

Reynolds also has taught digital and media production at Boston College for nearly 20 years. A life-long learner, he completed his graduate degree studies at Pepperdine University in educational technology, with a focus on virtual communities of practice and storytelling for transformational and systemic change.

His interest in research contributed to his co-founding of the Research Centre for Media Psychology (RCMP), which looks at ways that media, storytelling and technology foster human potential and well-being across the age span. RCMP is a collaboration between FableVision and Fielding Graduate University, as well as faculty from Harvard, Oxford and UCLA.

The Region 1 Science and Engineering Fair is a program of the Berkshire STEM Pipeline.
For more information, contact Shannon Zayac at (413) 662-5222 or Shannon.Zayac@mcla.edu.

The goal of the Pipeline is to build a connection between higher education, local school children in grades K-12, businesses and nonprofit agencies, and to see that all students are educated in STEM fields. The Pipeline also aims to enable youth to pursue post-secondary degrees or careers in these areas, and to raise their awareness of the benefits associated with an increased statewide focus on STEM.

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) is the Commonwealth’s public liberal arts college and a campus of the Massachusetts state university system. MCLA promotes excellence in learning and teaching, innovative scholarship, intellectual creativity, public service, applied knowledge, and active and responsible citizenship. MCLA graduates are prepared to be practical problem solvers and engaged, resilient global citizens.
For more information, go to www.mcla.edu.

 

*This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

Will Call #68: David Eppel bids farewell with Tartuffe

David Eppel shares thoughts on apartheid, creativity in the shadow of oppression, and his 35 years as a professor of theatre at Williams College*

David Eppel, professor of theatre at Williams College; photo by Jason Velázquez.
David Eppel, professor of theatre at Williams College; photo by Jason Velázquez.

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass—The Williams Theatre Department is proud to present Molière’s classic comedy Tartuffe, translated by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Richard Wilbur. Get ready for a Baroque romp, a minuet in rhyming couplets, and a wicked, hilarious satire, complete with keyhole peepers and eavesdroppers. First performed on May 12, 1664 at Versailles for Louis XIV, Tartuffe was instantly banned and had to be rewritten so as not to offend the church, the aristocracy, the king, and just about everyone else. Watch as the ruling classes are hoisted by their own hypocritical petard. All of the above, and much, much more, awaits…in thigh-slapping iambic pentameter, no less. There will be a post-performance Q&A after the Saturday evening performance hosted by “Monsieur Tartuffe comes to America” author Emmanuelle Delpech and Costume Designer Deborah Brothers. Performances are on Thursday, March 8th to Sunday, March 11th at 7:30 PM and Saturday, March 10th at 2:00 PM on the ’62 Center’s Adams Memorial Theatre, located at 1000 Main Street, in Williamstown, MA. Tickets are $3.

Tartuffe cast:
Nadiya Atkinson ’21
Tobias Delgado ’21
Terah Ehigiator ’18
Samori Etienne ’21
Caroline Fairweather ’20
Nicole Jones ‘20
Scott Lipman ’18
Evelyn Mahon ’18
John Murphy ’21
Christine Pash ’18
Thomas Robertshaw ’19
Jack Romans ’20
Jack Scaletta ’18

David Eppel, Director
Fiona Selmi ’21, Assistant Director
Jason Simms, Set Designer
Deborah Brothers, Costume Designer
Natalie Robin, Lighting Designer
Bobby McElver, Sound Designer
Julia Tucher ’21, Assistant Sound Designer
Paige Carter, Properties Master

The Theatre Department works to develop in each student an understanding of theatre that is both broad and deep. Through creative expression and critical study, we challenge students to engage both contemporary and historical modes of performance. Theatre students make artworks through design, acting, directing, and dramaturgy. They are encouraged to experiment, to risk, and to make bold choices. Working collaboratively with faculty and guest artists, students integrate intellectual, physical, and emotional responses into an array of live performances each academic year.

For tickets, visit the Williams ’62 Center Box Office Tues-Sat, 1-5 pm or call (413) 597-2425.

 

*This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

Cornbread Cafe #010

Pickxen, Grant Maloy Smith, Scott Thorn, Mikalyn Hay, The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow, Parsonsfield

Parsonsfield releases their new EP, WE, March 9, 2018; photo courtesy Signature Sounds Recordings.
Parsonsfield releases their new EP, WE, March 9, 2018; photo courtesy Signature Sounds Recordings.

From Parsonsfield on the release of WE:

“Everyone finds themselves searching for this theoretical ‘thing’ that is supposed to make them happy. Whether it’s a relationship or financial comfort, there’s a goal in our minds that once achieved, we’ll be able to start enjoying life,” says singer/songwriter and banjo player Chris Freeman. “Our circumstances, whether we’re rich or poor, are only half of what determines happiness. The rest is our thoughts, habits and connections with other people,” adds songwriter and mandolin player Antonio Alcorn. “WE is an inner journey to appreciate what you have, and to find happiness no matter what your lot in life.” Keep Reading

Will Call #67: Underground Railroad Game at ’62 Center

ADVISORY: Explicit content. Underground Railroad Game contains sexually explicit material, strong language, and mature themes, so is recommended for adventurous audiences ages 18 and up. Questions about what you’re in for? You can reach out to Producing Director, Randal Fippinger for more info.

Underground Railroad Game, created by Jennifer Kidwell & Scott R. Sheppard, and directed by Taibi Mager, plays the '62 Center March 1.
Underground Railroad Game, created by Jennifer Kidwell & Scott R. Sheppard, and directed by Taibi Mager, plays the ’62 Center March 1.

Created by Jennifer Kidwell & Scott R. Sheppard, Directed by Taibi Mager

Named one of the top ten theatre experiences of 2016 by the New York Times, Underground Railroad Game is a vivid, piercing piece of experimental performance from Philadelphia-based company Lightning Rod Special. Over its rapid-fire 75 minutes, the piece toes the line between sketch comedy show and excruciating American history lesson, set in a middle school classroom. Keep Reading

Cornbread Cafe #009

Chris Andres, Janie Barnett, The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow, Almond&Olive, Keeton Coffman, Honey Whiskey Trio

Natalie Alms and Ollie Davidson of Almond&Olive; submitted photo.
Natalie Alms and Ollie Davidson of Almond&Olive; submitted photo.

From their website:

Alms and Davidson believe that, when possible, using their platform of musical creation and performance to give back to those in need is a natural extension of their personal goals – to make the world a better place for those who live in it. With that charge, once finished, their debut album will be also be used to help give back. Alms and Davidson have decided to donate a portion of the proceeds from the initial sales of the album to the Jackson Galaxy Foundation (JGF), a foundation founded by Animal Planet’s Jackson Galaxy. JGF will use the funds donated by A&O to help animal shelters bolster their animal adoption programs, rehab crumbling animal housing and enhance vital community animal welfare programs.

Welcome! brothers and sisters to Episode #9—of the Cornbread Cafe. I am the mongrel, and I’ll be your host today. Be sure to ask your waiter about about this week’s specials, which are all prepared using only the finest ingredients in American Roots music. Cazh and cozy, we’re located at the five-corners of Blues, Americana, Folk, Country, and Gospel. And you can sometimes catch an express to Rock ’n’ Roll at the bus stop across the way. *

 

Featured in this Episode:

Chris Andres • “Tired Old Town”Tired Old Town
Janie Barnett & Blue Room• “Buy That Thing You”You See This River
The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow • “Poisonous Me”The Heart of the Run
Almond & Olive • “Standing at the Precipice”Standing at the Precipice
Keeton Coffman • “The Tribe” Killer Eyes
Honey Whiskey Trio“The Lone Wild Bird”Rye Woman

We’re going to get right into the music this show, because the hardcopy of the EP, Tired Old Town, by Chris Anres with Gary McDannold showed up in the mail just a couple days ago, and I have been impatient to share it with you. I couldn’t decide between the five tracks on this 2017 release, so I figured we’d go with the title track, Tired Old Town, to get things goin’.

Chris Andres, with Gary McDannold

Events

See, look it that. I invite musicians to send me their music, they do, it shows up on show just like that. And it’s just that easy. Look for the contact link at cornbread.cafe for more info. It’s been an episode or two since we’ve picked from the all-natural Country section of the menu, so I guess that why that tune hits the spot just right. Chris Andres leans more than a little bit towards the outlaw end of the Country spectrum, and all I can say is thank God for outlaws or wouldn’t have any friends at all.

 

 


Janie Barnett

Events

Janie Barnett; submitted photo.
Janie Barnett; submitted photo.

Now, back on Episode #6, I was honored to have Janie Barnett as our guest. I played a portion of our conversation on the show, and then made the entire interview available separately via an audio player in the show notes. If you haven’t yet, I’d encourage you to go back and listen to both. I didn’t include the clip that I’m gonna share with you now in the main show in Episode 6. Call me superstitious, but I think I felt like if I held on to it, if I didn’t let it out of its cage, or the song she discusses, maybe I could somehow keep this thing from happening. Maybe I could shield my children, everybody’s children, by just not talking about it. But I’m a fool to fool myself that way. And waiting until a calmer time to have this conversation means waiting until the pain subsides. Thank you Janie for preserving that pain in your music, your work. Thanks again for talking about your very powerful song, “Buy That Thing.”

 

 

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow

Events

That was “Buy That Thing” off Janie Barnett’s 2017 release, You See This River. Remember you can pick up that LP by visiting the show notes for this episode at cornbread.cafe and looking for the iTunes, Amazon, or other purchase links. And, since these links are usually our affiliate links, you help support this program with your purchase, at no extra extra cost to you.

Next, I was going to play a track off the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow’s self-titled September release. But I had my Cornbread library on shuffle yesterday, and the tune, “Poisonous Me” from their 2016 live album “Heart of the Run” came up. And I was like, “I’ve played that on the Cafe, haven’t I?” I had to go back and check, and the answer was no, no I haven’t. I guess I’ve just played it for myself so often I kinda figured I must have. So let’s spin that right now to correct that oversight. Here’s “Poisonous Me,” by the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow on the Cornbread Cafe.

 

 

The festival scene is starting to kick into gear around the country, and I hope you get to experience as many as you can. Really, if music were an ecosystem, festivals would be the natural habitat for Americana bands and the Rootsians who love them. Coming up this weekend is the

Wintergrass Festival

February 22 – February 25
Hyatt Regency, Bellevue Washington,
just across the lake from Seattle.

And the fourth annual Back Porch Festival returns March 1–4, with all-star line-ups of American roots artists at the Academy of Music and The Parlor Room in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Reserve your body space at signaturesoundspresents.com/back-porch/ or, actually, just go to our show notes at cornbread.cafe and click the link to get you there.

I would provide info about SXSW, coming up March 9–18 in Austin, TX, but until they put me on the press list, I can’t very well do that, now can I? You’d think for $1,650 per pass, they could afford to hire someone to put music podcasters on the press list, right? Hell with ‘em, I say. Besides, I’m busy that week.

Almond & Olive

Events

Anyway, in this next set, I have to play the only tune I have from Keeton Coffman that I have NOT shared with you yet on this show, I think. The tune is “The Tribe” off his 2017 release “Killer Eyes,” which would definitely be in the running for a Cornbread Award, if we had such a thing here. But he just released his video for “The Tribe” this week, and like the rest of the videos from that release, it fits the music perfectly. You can check out the embed in the shownotes.

 

 

Keeton Coffman

Events

First though, let’s hear from one of our most recent discoveries, Almond&Olive, out of Chicago. We featured their song “We Will” on Episode #6—now let’s hear the title track off “Standing at the Precipice.”

Both of those songs are just pristine, aren’t they? Go together pretty well, too, if I do say so myself. You know, in addition to buying music and merch from the artists you hear on the show, you can connect with them through their sites or social media pages. I always provide the link s if I’ve got ‘em. And when you find those songs that really resonate with you, why not shoot the artists a quick not and tell them how much you enjoyed hearing their tunes on the Cornbread Cafe. It won’t help them pay the rent, but it does let them know that their efforts are appreciated.

 

 

Honey Whiskey Trio

Events

Last up is a song I’ve been saving up, though I can’t say I’ve known what for. This week, I know. From the Honey Whiskey Trio’s 2017 release, Rye Woman, is a song of comfort that you might just know. And I think I’ll let the Honeys have the last word on this episode, so I’m just going to send out “The Lone Wild Bird,” along with my deepest sorrow, to the families of Parkland, Florida.

 

Buy Rye Woman directly from the Honeys

 

 

 

 

 

* Note: Artist links provide access directly to artists’ websites or social media homepages. All album links provide access to song or album purchase options, often through our affiliate programs with Apple Music or Amazon.com, which help make this show possible.

Musicians’ bio info comes from the artists, their websites, or their publicists. Click on names below to visit their websites where you can get the full story, photos, and very often video.

The Cornbread Cafe #8: Not a Valentine’s Day episode. Unless’n you want it to be.

Tanya Gallagher [explicit lyrics], Kate Lush, The Suitcase Junket, Bumper Jacksons, Faint Peter, Birds of Chicago

Tanya Gallagher; photo courtesy tanyagallagher.com.
Tanya Gallagher; photo courtesy tanyagallagher.com.

“Virginia taught me love, it taught me heartache, but most importantly it taught me that a home away from home can exist. These songs represent an incredible time of personal growth.”

— Tanya Gallagher

Welcome! brothers and sisters to Episode #8—of the Cornbread Cafe. I am the mongrel, and I’ll be back in the kitchen today cooking up a sampler platter of the best from a sprawling menu of American Roots music. Cazh and cozy, we’re located at the five-corners of Blues, Americana, Folk, Country, and Gospel. And you can sometimes catch an express to Rock ’n’ Roll at the bus stop across the way. *

 

Featured in this Episode:

Tanya Gallagher“3002 Miles” (explicit lyrics)Virgina
Kate Lush“Good Good Love”Let It Fly
The Suitcase Junket“Swamp Chicken”Pile Driver
Bumper Jacksons“Corina Corina”I’ve Never Met a Stranger
Faint Peter“Texas” Redoubt
Birds of Chicago“Etoile d’Amour (Stardust)”American Flowers

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TLC #62 — Remembering the Women’s March: Voices from the Road

Hey Greylock Nation—

Today is Tuesday, January 16, 2018, and you’re listening to episode 62 of the Top Left Corner. I’m your host, Jay Velazquez, and, as always, I thank you for tuning in.

All photos by Jason Velázquez.
All photos by Jason Velázquez.

We’re coming up this week on the first anniversary of the Women’s March, the largest single-day protest in U.S. history, with half a million attendees showing up for the flagship event in Washington D.C., approximately 4 million participating in events around the country, and well over 5 million demonstrators world-wide.

Although I haven’t talked much about it, I was fortunate, more than fortunate actually, to attend the Women’s March on Washington. At the last minute Meghan Whilden, Executive Director of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Berkshire Community College, contacted me to let me know about an empty seat on one of several busses heading to the Capitol from Western Massachusetts. She wanted to send me down as one of the Berkshires’ own journalists on location at one of the most profound and powerful experiences on American soil of the 21st Century. My bus left from Northampton, Mass about 1:30 a.m. packed primarily with women from the Pioneer Valley, but also a good share of Berkshire residents. The buses leaving out of Pittsfield had all left earlier the evening before.

Our bus arrived and parked in the lot of a stadium outside of the Capitol, and, keeping close to my Berkshires contingent, I made my way toward the National Mall, interviewing people along the way. Long before I saw the columns of the Supreme Court or any of the monuments, I knew that I’d been captured by history and marked in a way that would be almost painful for its permanence.

I reported via Facebook LIVE video and through live audio broadcasts using the Mixlr Internet radio service. I posted photos and text updates until first the cellular service in D.C. got completely clogged, or intentionally disabled—we never found out— and then eventually my phone’s battery ran dry, and I had no way to charge it without finding my way through a rolling pink sea of determination.

On the trip back to Western Mass, I tried to piece together some way to tell a story that was weightier and more expansive than I’d ever been tasked to convey. Harder still was knowing what to do with the strange distance I felt between myself as a man and a reporter at the scene and the women who were returning as victorious participants. There were so many women who’d attended not just the March on Washington, but also the sister events in the Berkshires and beyond, who had their stories and experiences to share as women with other women. Who was I to show up at their campfire and ask to be passed the talking stick? And with such really excellent coverage by so many distinguished national journalists, I couldn’t see what contribution I might make.

I spent a good amount of time on both the way down and the way back talking with Emily Cutts, staff writer for the Daily Hampshire Gazette. I meant to ask her what it felt like to be a female journalist covering the story, and whether she felt she needed to try to keep a level of professional detachment from the events. I don’t know how any reporter, man or woman, could have kept their heart behind a fence, to be honest.

But I never got to ask her. The bus stopped moving about 40 minutes south of Northampton and wouldn’t budge again. In a flurry of calls to family and frenzied tapping on Uber, the women and men who shared such powerful solidarity for the last 24 hours made their separate ways out into the pre-dawn darkness and frost. My lot, and that of my traveling companion, was looking more and more dire as Uber drivers started running out, and I couldn’t get my phone to install the damn app anyway. In an act of selflessness and generosity, charity really at that hour of the morning, my newly met colleague gave up her seat so that we could make it back to Northampton. She ended up waiting over an hour in the cold until a friend was able to get there and shuttle her back to Paradise City. Thank you. Thank you again, Emily Cutts. Your strength, exhibited through kindness and self-sacrifice was so…feminine.

It didn’t take me long, sitting starting at the empty white screen of my computer, to realize that what Megan Whilden had done, intended or not, was not to dispatch me to the nation’s capitol to go get that story, but to send me there so that the devastating 24-hour transformation I underwent would inform my decisions on what topics I would cover and how I would cover them from that point on. If it seemed to you that the reporting coming out of the Greylock Glass was steeped in estrogen in 2017, well now you know why.

I looked for stories not just about women in the Berkshires, but about how those women, through their own work and lives, reflected the growing realization that America was about to reckon with a women’s movement that was gaining in power, momentum, and political sophistication. The country would begin to come to terms with gender inequities and injustice not because it was convenient at the moment, but because women had decided they were done with gradualism.

The Greylock Glass reported on many, many women achieving amazing things in education, literature, music, politics, and other areas. When searching for a source to talk to about a subject that wasn’t inherently masculine or feminine, I challenged myself to be sure to contact a woman with equal expertise or credentials if no reason existed not to feature a feminine voice. Finally, just as important to me as including women’s voices in our reporting was committing to give time to stories about issues that may have a veneer of gender neutrality, but which, in fact, affect women disproportionately, and often with strikingly unjust consequences.

What did I learn pursuing this slight editorial tweaking in 2017 was that including women more often in news coverage, as vital actors on the many diverse stages of human experience, as agents of their own fortunes and as agents of change in their communities? I learned that it’s really no professional challenge. It’s just a personal habit. Plenty of men made appearances in our podcasts and in our pages last year, too—when it made sense, in the interest of the informing the audience, to talk with them. But never as the default gender. And while I haven’t analyzed stories and podcasts from 2015 or 2016 to see if last year rectified a gender disparity of which I wasn’t aware, I don’t think I have to at this point. And I don’t think I’m going to have to make any special effort in 2018 to ensure journalistic gender equity. If, as I hope, I’m in a position to hire a reporter this year, I’ll be looking forward to nurturing the habits of awareness in her or in him that took root for me, and for the world, during the first Women’s March on January 21, 2017.

Although I never did come up with a satisfactory way to chronicle my trip to Washington, I did return home with a couple hours-worth of audio interviews. I’ve sifted through those conversations and pulled out a small collection of my favorite quotes. Except for the voice of Kamala Harris at the end, the speakers are going to remain nameless, though some of you will, doubtless, recognize one or two of the women I spoke with. So now, I’d like to share with you, as a small way the Greylock Glass can commemorate that historic demonstration, Ten Minutes of Voices on the Road to the Women’s March on Washington.

Volunteers invited to join in 25th annual MLK Day of Service

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” theme for 2018 observance *

Collage created with public domain imagery, Notes on "A Letter From Birmingham Jail," courtesy the <a href="http://www.thekingcenter.org/archive/document/notes-letter-birmingham-jail" target="new">King Archive</a>, and the photo, "Recreation of Martin Luther King's Cell in Birmingham Jail," by Adam Jones, Ph.D. (Own work); CC BY-SA 3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ARecreation_of_Martin_Luther_King's_Cell_in_Birmingham_Jail_-_National_Civil_Rights_Museum_-_Downtown_Memphis_-_Tennessee_-_USA.jpg">via Wikimedia Commons
Collage created with public domain imagery, Notes on “A Letter From Birmingham Jail,” courtesy the King Archive, and the photo, “Recreation of Martin Luther King’s Cell in Birmingham Jail,” by Adam Jones, Ph.D. (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) and the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition (NBCC) encourage all community members to participate in the 25th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Day of Service on Monday, Jan. 15, which will feature volunteer service projects from 9 a.m. to noon, and a program and lunch to begin at 12:30 p.m. in the campus’s Venable Gym.

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MCLA announces new FPA programs

2018 sees expanded options within Fine and Performing Arts *

Collage created by Jason Velázquez with public domain imagery and the photo, "Friend's Studio," by David J (Flickr) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.
Collage created with public domain imagery and the photo, “Friend’s studio.” by By David J (Flickr) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) announces the addition of five new programs to its Department of Fine and Performing Arts (FPA), as two concentrations, in design and studio art, and three minors in dance, design, and music production, recently were added.

“The design concentration prepares students for traditional graphic design careers, web design, animation, concept, as well as character development for films, graphic novels or video games. It’s also great for illustrators and public relations professionals, and for self-promotion,” said Melanie Mowinski, associate professor of visual art.

“We imagine that students who are choosing the studio art concentration are more likely to be interested in drawing and painting, and students in the design concentration to be more interested in typography, book arts, letterpress, digital design and traditional graphic design kinds of things,” Mowinski said.

Also in FPA, students may access minors in dance and music production. Already, a number of students who focus on theatre and arts management have added the dance minor, according to Laura Standley, associate professor of theatre.

“We have a large group of students on campus that are interested in performance in general. In addition to producing a growing number of musicals, many others expressed interest in music theatre,” Standley said.

“I am definitely excited about this new dance minor and am interested to see how it will bleed into FPA theatre and make itself known as its own thing,” said Bryana Bradley ’17.

Tom Truss III, who joined the faculty last fall, is helping to coordinate the new dance minor. He brings to campus a wide range of skills that not only shape the classes he teaches, but also the dance minor, including experiences at the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange in Washington, D.C., the New Zealand Conservatory of Dance, and Jacob’s Pillow in Great Barrington. In addition, he is certified in the Alexander Technique, which he obtained in San Francisco, Calif.

For the music production minor, several classes were revised, while others were added. New courses include “Home Studio Recording,” “Advanced Recording/Live Sound,” and “Music Production for Film.”

Other new programs at MCLA include the computer science major’s concentration in electrical engineering, and a new entrepreneurship minor in the business program. In addition, last summer, MCLA and the Department of Biology announced the addition of two new Bachelor of Science degrees – in Health Sciences and in Community Health Education – as well as a new pre-medical professions concentration and a new pre-veterinary concentration.

The Health Sciences major is available as a general major or with four different concentrations; pre-physician assistant, pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, or medical technology. It prepares students to pursue advanced study in a variety of health fields. The new Community Health Education major addresses a growing demand for health care educators, both locally and nationwide.

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) is the Commonwealth’s public liberal arts college and a campus of the Massachusetts state university system. MCLA promotes excellence in learning and teaching, innovative scholarship, intellectual creativity, public service, applied knowledge, and active and responsible citizenship. MCLA graduates are prepared to be practical problem solvers and engaged, resilient global citizens.

*This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

Emily Rubin, editor of “The Write Treatment,” to speak at Kimball Farms

Kimball Farms hosts talk by Emily Rubin, editor of The Write Treatment *

LENOX, Mass. — Kimball Farms Life Care in Lenox will host a presentation by cancer survivor and author Emily Rubin on Thursday, Jan. 18, at 2 p.m. Ms. Rubin leads creativity and writing workshops for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers in New York City.
Ms. Rubin published “The Write Treatment Anthology Volume I 2011-2016,” an anthology of work by her workshop participants. Her presentation is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served.
Those wishing to attend are asked to register by calling 413-637-7043.

Author and cancer survivor Emily Rubin will give a talk at Kimball Farms Life Care in Lenox on Thursday, January 18, at 2:00 p.m.; image courtesy emilyrubin.net.
Author and cancer survivor Emily Rubin will give a talk at Kimball Farms Life Care in Lenox on Thursday, January 18, at 2:00 p.m.; image courtesy emilyrubin.net.

 

Rubin was born in Queens, NY and now lives in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. She graduated from Bard College in 1978 where she was dance/theater major. A highlight of her time at Bard, in addition to her dance studies, was a writing workshop with visiting professor in literature Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Read her full bio here.

Established in 1989, Kimball Farms provides a continuum of care, including independent living, assisted living, memory care, short-term rehabilitation and long-term skilled nursing care.

 

 

When you purchase this book through our affiliate program with Amazon via this image link, you also support the Greylock Glass—at no additional cost to you.
When you purchase this book through our affiliate program with Amazon via this image link, you also support the Greylock Glass—at no additional cost to you.

Kimball Farms Life Care Continuing Care Retirement Community is the only Life Care community in Western Massachusetts. Based in Lenox, Kimball Farms includes Independent Living, Pine Hill Assisted Living, the Life Enrichment Memory Care Program, and Kimball Farms Nursing Care Center. Kimball Farms is owned by Berkshire Healthcare, a leader among not-for-profit, post-acute care organizations in Massachusetts and is managed by an affiliate of Berkshire Health Systems, the region’s leading provider of comprehensive health care services. For more information, visit www.kimballfarms.org.
The Write Treatment Anthology Volume I 2011-2016

*This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

Community: Guiding Good Choices — nbCC parenting workshop series

Workshop series to help parents improve family bonding and reduce risk of teenage drug use *

In a five-week workshop series called Guiding Good Choices, parents will learn how to strengthen their bonds with their children and reduce the risk that their children will use drugs. The five-week program is being offered by the Northern Berkshire Community Coalitions’ nb21 program and The Family Place beginning Tuesday, January 23rd from 5:30-7:30 pm at the Mary Spitzer Senior Center located at 116 Ashland Street., North Adams.

Guiding Good Choices is an interactive program for all parents of children in grades 4-8. In a lively and open atmosphere, parents will learn specific strategies to help their children avoid drug use and other adolescent problem behaviors, and develop into healthy adults. Parents will learn to set clear family guidelines on drugs, as well as learn and practice skills to strengthen family bonds, help their children develop healthy behaviors, and increase children’s involvement in the family.

The program is based on research, which has shown that when children are bonded to their parents, school and non-drug-using peers, they are less likely to get involved in drug use or other behavior problems. Most middle school aged youth choose not to drink alcohol or use marijuana. However according to the 2017 Prevention Needs Assessment, 11% of 8th graders in Northern Berkshire County reported using alcohol and marijuana in the last 30 days.

There is no cost to parents. Dinner and childcare are provided. For more information and to register, please call Stephanie Puc or Chris Griffin at 413-663-7588.

*This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

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