Greylock NationLocal Weather Alerts
There are currently no active weather alerts.

Top Left Corner - page 2

TLC #58: MCLA creates Chief Diversity Officer position; PROFILE—Print Shop Williamstown

Recent friction between students of color and MCLA administration not the main reason for creation of execution position of Chief Diversity Officer says college president

By Phil Roeder [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons and By Magicpiano (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons; Chief Diversity Officer
Graphic composed of photo of Murdock Hall, by Magicpiano; CC BY-SA 3.0 and Iowa City protests by By Phil Roeder; CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

Hey Greylock Nation—

Today is Sunday, October 15, 2017, and you’re listening to episode 58 of the Top Left Corner. I’m your host, Jay Velazquez, and, as always, I thank you for tuning in.

We spoke this week with Dr. James Birge, President of the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams. The posting of the newly created executive level position of Chief Diversity Officer caught our eye, so we thought finding out a little bit about what went into the decision to create the position would be illuminating.

We also caught up with Elinor Goodwin, owner of the Print Shop, Williamstown, who is now comfortably settled into her new digs on Spring Street. The Print Shop has long been the go-to source for all the printed items that this digital media startup, The Greylock Glass, needs on a regular basis. And there’s a reason for that, which we’ll hear about on this first edition of the resurrected segment, the Berkshire Business Files here on the Top Left Corner.

Elinor Goodwin; from http://printshopwilliamstown.com/about/
Elinor Goodwin; from web site of the Print Shop, Williamstown

Berkshire Business Files: The Print Shop

The Print Shop Williamstown, a full-service print shop and marketing agency, is located in the Berkshires of Massachusetts. We work with organizations of all sizes: service professionals, banks, schools, teams, administration, parents, booster organizations and coaches to provide attractive materials within what are often limited budgets. We enjoy working with our clients from developing marketing concepts, to design, through to the printed publication. We also assist organizations with advertising campaigns—soliciting, designing, and placement of advertising.

 

Chief Diversity Officer

Locations: North Adams, MA
Posted: Sep 27, ’17
Type: Full-time

About Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts:

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) is a dynamic and vibrant four-year public college located in the beautiful Berkshire Hills of Western Massachusetts. Founded in 1894, MCLA is the Commonwealth’s public liberal arts college of the Massachusetts State University System. MCLA was named a Top Ten Public Liberal Arts College by U.S. News and World Report. MCLA is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC), a national consortium positioned at the forefront of the conversation on the value of a liberal arts education. MCLA also earned a place on Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s list of 100 Best Values in Public Colleges. The ranking cites colleges that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost, and the College was again named to the President’s Honor Roll for Service by the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Job Description:

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) invites applications for Chief Diversity Officer (CDO). We are the designated public, liberal arts college among the nine State Universities of Massachusetts and one of 29 Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC) in the country. We seek to be an exemplar of diversity, equity, and inclusion by creating an environment where anyone can excel in their learning, teaching, and work.

The CDO will be a thought leader and action driver in extending and deepening our diverse and inclusive MCLA community. The CDO will work with academic, administrative, and student leadership to ensure that diversity, equity, and inclusion are valued and reflected in all areas of the college, and will help build and maintain bridges to our community and region in regard to shared commitments to inclusion and equity for all. The CDO will be a member of the College’s Executive Staff and report directly to the President.

General Duties and Responsibilities:

Work with faculty, executive and administrative staff, and students to direct, implement, and oversee institutional planning on diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives that positively impact student and employee experiences at MCLA.

Translate and implement best practices in diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in higher education at MCLA.

Work with President to develop departmental budget that enhances the size and function of the Chief Diversity Officer’s office and provides resources for programming, meetings, professional development, and travel.

Identify and help to ameliorate the conditions/policies/practices at all levels of institutional life that impede the development of an inclusive climate in order to achieve the college’s mission.

Work with academic and faculty leadership to integrate diversity, equity, and inclusion into the curriculum and faculty teaching methods.

In collaboration with others, develop comprehensive diversity and inclusion training and education programs for faculty, staff, administration, and students that improve how we interact with one another, that value diversity and inclusion in decision-making, and that create a welcome environment for students and employees regardless of background.

Collaborate with Human Resources Office, faculty, staff, administration, and students to review, revise, and work toward the goals of the College’s Diversity Statement, including, but not limited to, hiring a diverse workforce that is reflective of the student population.

Support and contribute to the efforts of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force to implement new and/or revised policies and programming that contribute to a healthy campus climate and to cultivate a broader institutional dialogue on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Work with existing staff and policies at the College to help respond to matters regarding incidents of bias and/or to establish a system that provides just approaches and remedies to bias at MCLA.

Effectively communicate with internal and external populations on matters regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion and advise others on strategies to improve communications.
Represent MCLA at public meetings and serve on external Boards that enhance campus/community partnerships.
Work with other campus offices to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in their function (i.e. human resources, admissions, institutional advancement).
Collaborate with designated faculty members on diversity initiative matters.
Supervise student workers/interns and ad hoc project staff.

Requirements:

Earned doctorate or other terminal degree strongly preferred
Six to ten years of diversity and inclusion-related work in higher education
College teaching experience highly desired
Significant experience facilitating group dialogue in a higher education environment or other setting
Demonstrated experience with analyzing a complex environment for strategic intervention
Strong interpersonal skills to establish effective relationships with campus colleagues, students, diverse constituents, and local community members
Excellent writing, communications, and organizational skills
Demonstrated experience working with and training students and colleagues on matters related to race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, and other identities
Demonstrated ability to maintain confidentiality

Additionally, the MCLA community has identified the following desired characteristics in a Chief Diversity Officer: Someone who is action-oriented while rooted in theory and reflection; one who values collaboration and communication; one who respects diverse thoughts, solutions, and opinions; a thought leader capable of hearing others’ ideas and capable of sharing her/his/their own ideas and thoughts; a leader who values transparency; a leader committed to the ideals of social justice.

Additional Information:

This is a full-time, benefits-eligible, position.

The deadline for applications is October 16, 2017.

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and affirmative action in its educational programs, activities and employment practices. The college complies with all federal, state, and local laws and regulations advancing equal employment. Applicants who will enrich the diversity of the campus community are strongly encouraged to apply. Visit www.mcla.edu.

Application Instructions:

Interested candidates must apply electronically and should submit a letter of interest and resume by clicking the “Apply Now” button at the bottom of the job description page found HERE (Submission period ends 10/16/17).

 

Save

Save

TLC #54: 10/10 Democratic Primary, 1st Berkshire District candidate John Barrett

Election 2017: A conversation with John Barrett, III.

Find him online here.

Hello, Greylock Nation—

Today is Saturday, October 07, 2017, and this is a special election series episode of the Top Left Corner, presented by the Greylock Glass. We don’t have the resources yet to cover all races, but due to the enormous popularity of our coverage of the 2016 State Senate election, we decided to provide you, our audience, with a similar opportunity to hear unhurried, unscripted conversations with the candidates for the position of State Representative, 1st Berkshire District, a seat left empty by the untimely death of Gail Cariddi in June.

John Barrett, III; photo by Jason Velázquez.
John Barrett, III; photo by Jason Velázquez.

 

The four candidates in this series of interviews are facing off in the Democratic primary election on October 10 to determine who will face off against Republican challenger Christine M. Canning in the November 7 general election. The four interviewees are John Barrett, Lisa Blackmer, Stephanie Bosley and Kevin Towle.

Each candidate was given an opportunity to describe their backgrounds and experience, to discuss the the political legacy left by Cariddi, and to offer a vision of how they would address the priorities of the district at the statehouse level. They also responded to similar questions about the issues of poverty, and employment, healthcare, transportation, education, climate change, and race relations. While every effort was made to ensure fairness to all candidates, conversations between different individuals will, of course, vary in content in unpredictable ways. These organic differences are, we hope, the reason that you appreciate extended discussions between people rather than soundbites or pre-recorded position statements.

I enjoyed my talks with each of these contenders, and have decided to extend the Greylock Glass’ policy against the endorsement of one candidate over another for this election season. I hope that by providing this election series of episodes, the Greylock Glass will assist its voting audience in deciding for whom to cast their ballot on Tuesday.

This episode, number 54, features my conversation with John Barrett.

We hope you enjoyed the chance to hear the views of this candidate for State Representative of the 1st Berkshire District. We put a lot of time and effort into it. If you found this service helpful, please consider making a contribution by going to greylockglass.com/support.

Remember this is the Democratic primary, so if you want a say in who will face off against Christine Canning in November, don’t forget to get out and vote on Tuesday, October 10th. That’s our show for today, I’ve been your host, writer, editor, engineer, and web administrator, Jason Velazquez, and I hope you join me again on the Top Left Corner.

Save

Save

Save

Save

TLC #55: 10/10 Democratic Primary, 1st Berkshire District candidate Lisa Blackmer

Election 2017: A conversation with Lisa Blackmer.

Find him online here.

Hello, Greylock Nation—

Today is Saturday, October 07, 2017, and this is a special election series episode of the Top Left Corner, presented by the Greylock Glass. We don’t have the resources yet to cover all races, but due to the enormous popularity of our coverage of the 2016 State Senate election, we decided to provide you, our audience, with a similar opportunity to hear unhurried, unscripted conversations with the candidates for the position of State Representative, 1st Berkshire District, a seat left empty by the untimely death of Gail Cariddi in June.

Lisa Blackmer; photo by Jason Velázquez.
Lisa Blackmer; photo by Jason Velázquez.

 

The four candidates in this series of interviews are facing off in the Democratic primary election on October 10 to determine who will face off against Republican challenger Christine M. Canning in the November 7 general election. The four interviewees are John Barrett, Lisa Blackmer, Stephanie Bosley and Kevin Towle.

Each candidate was given an opportunity to describe their backgrounds and experience, to discuss the the political legacy left by Cariddi, and to offer a vision of how they would address the priorities of the district at the statehouse level. They also responded to similar questions about the issues of poverty, and employment, healthcare, transportation, education, climate change, and race relations. While every effort was made to ensure fairness to all candidates, conversations between different individuals will, of course, vary in content in unpredictable ways. These organic differences are, we hope, the reason that you appreciate extended discussions between people rather than soundbites or pre-recorded position statements.

I enjoyed my talks with each of these contenders, and have decided to extend the Greylock Glass’ policy against the endorsement of one candidate over another for this election season. I hope that by providing this election series of episodes, the Greylock Glass will assist its voting audience in deciding for whom to cast their ballot on Tuesday.

This episode, number 55, features my conversation with Lisa Blackmer.

We hope you enjoyed the chance to hear the views of this candidate for State Representative of the 1st Berkshire District. We put a lot of time and effort into it. If you found this service helpful, please consider making a contribution by going to greylockglass.com/support.

Remember this is the Democratic primary, so if you want a say in who will face off against Christine Canning in November, don’t forget to get out and vote on Tuesday, October 10th. That’s our show for today, I’ve been your host, writer, editor, engineer, and web administrator, Jason Velazquez, and I hope you join me again on the Top Left Corner.

Save

Save

TLC #56: 10/10 Democratic Primary, 1st Berkshire District candidate Stephanie Bosley

Election 2017: A conversation with Stephanie Bosley.

Find her online here.

Hello, Greylock Nation—

Today is Saturday, October 07, 2017, and this is a special election series episode of the Top Left Corner, presented by the Greylock Glass. We don’t have the resources yet to cover all races, but due to the enormous popularity of our coverage of the 2016 State Senate election, we decided to provide you, our audience, with a similar opportunity to hear unhurried, unscripted conversations with the candidates for the position of State Representative, 1st Berkshire District, a seat left empty by the untimely death of Gail Cariddi in June.

Stephanie Bosley; photo by Jason Velázquez.
Stephanie Bosley; photo by Jason Velázquez.

 

The four candidates in this series of interviews are facing off in the Democratic primary election on October 10 to determine who will face off against Republican challenger Christine M. Canning in the November 7 general election. The four interviewees are John Barrett, Lisa Blackmer, Stephanie Bosley and Kevin Towle.

Each candidate was given an opportunity to describe their backgrounds and experience, to discuss the the political legacy left by Cariddi, and to offer a vision of how they would address the priorities of the district at the statehouse level. They also responded to similar questions about the issues of poverty, and employment, healthcare, transportation, education, climate change, and race relations. While every effort was made to ensure fairness to all candidates, conversations between different individuals will, of course, vary in content in unpredictable ways. These organic differences are, we hope, the reason that you appreciate extended discussions between people rather than soundbites or pre-recorded position statements.

I enjoyed my talks with each of these contenders, and have decided to extend the Greylock Glass’ policy against the endorsement of one candidate over another for this election season. I hope that by providing this election series of episodes, the Greylock Glass will assist its voting audience in deciding for whom to cast their ballot on Tuesday.

This episode, number 56, features my conversation with Stephanie Bosley.

We hope you enjoyed the chance to hear the views of this candidate for State Representative of the 1st Berkshire District. We put a lot of time and effort into it. If you found this service helpful, please consider making a contribution by going to greylockglass.com/support.

Remember this is the Democratic primary, so if you want a say in who will face off against Christine Canning in November, don’t forget to get out and vote on Tuesday, October 10th. That’s our show for today, I’ve been your host, writer, editor, engineer, and web administrator, Jason Velazquez, and I hope you join me again on the Top Left Corner.

Save

Save

Save

TLC #57: 10/10 Democratic Primary, 1st Berkshire District candidate Kevin Towle

Election 2017: A conversation with Kevin Towle.

Find him online here.

Hello, Greylock Nation—

Today is Saturday, October 07, 2017, and this is a special election series episode of the Top Left Corner, presented by the Greylock Glass. We don’t have the resources yet to cover all races, but due to the enormous popularity of our coverage of the 2016 State Senate election, we decided to provide you, our audience, with a similar opportunity to hear unhurried, unscripted conversations with the candidates for the position of State Representative, 1st Berkshire District, a seat left empty by the untimely death of Gail Cariddi in June.

Kevin Towle; photo by Jason Velázquez.
Kevin Towle; photo by Jason Velázquez.

 

The four candidates in this series of interviews are facing off in the Democratic primary election on October 10 to determine who will face off against Republican challenger Christine M. Canning in the November 7 general election. The four interviewees are John Barrett, Lisa Blackmer, Stephanie Bosley and Kevin Towle.

Each candidate was given an opportunity to describe their backgrounds and experience, to discuss the the political legacy left by Cariddi, and to offer a vision of how they would address the priorities of the district at the statehouse level. They also responded to similar questions about the issues of poverty, and employment, healthcare, transportation, education, climate change, and race relations. While every effort was made to ensure fairness to all candidates, conversations between different individuals will, of course, vary in content in unpredictable ways. These organic differences are, we hope, the reason that you appreciate extended discussions between people rather than soundbites or pre-recorded position statements.

I enjoyed my talks with each of these contenders, and have decided to extend the Greylock Glass’ policy against the endorsement of one candidate over another for this election season. I hope that by providing this election series of episodes, the Greylock Glass will assist its voting audience in deciding for whom to cast their ballot on Tuesday.

This episode, number 57, features my conversation with Kevin Towle.

We hope you enjoyed the chance to hear the views of this candidate for State Representative of the 1st Berkshire District. We put a lot of time and effort into it. If you found this service helpful, please consider making a contribution by going to greylockglass.com/support.

Remember this is the Democratic primary, so if you want a say in who will face off against Christine Canning in November, don’t forget to get out and vote on Tuesday, October 10th. That’s our show for today, I’ve been your host, writer, editor, engineer, and web administrator, Jason Velazquez, and I hope you join me again on the Top Left Corner.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

TLC #53: Word × Word and Fiction Of Now

Fiction Of Now

Poetry in the age of post-truth

"Fiction Of Now" takes place at the Berkshire Museum October 6 at 8:00 p.m.; graphic courtesy WordXWord.
“Fiction Of Now” takes place at the Berkshire Museum October 6 at 8:00 p.m.; graphic courtesy WordXWord.

Pittsfield, Mass.—WordXWord presents Fiction of Now, a program of work by poets spanning a wide range of ages and styles, October 6, 8P at the Berkshire Museum 39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA. The performance will take place in the physical context of Berkshire Museum’s Morgan Bulkeley: Nature Culture Clash, a career retrospective of the artist’s work. Admission is free.

Fiction of Now

Poetry in the Age of Post-Truth

 

Friday, October 6, 8:00 p.m.
Berkshire Museum
39 South Street, Pittsfield
Free

For Fiction of Now, WordXWord has challenged poets to create and present original work that in some way resonates with the questions raised by Mr Bulkeley’s work, or more broadly, work that addresses the absurdity of life in a post truth age. Poets are free to address this challenge as they see fit or from whatever direction they choose. The result is likely to be a wild ride.

"Politics of Identity / Poetry of Inclusion & Exclusion" happens November 12 at Gallery 51 in North Adams; graphic courtesy WordXWord.
“Politics of Identity / Poetry of Inclusion & Exclusion” happens November 12 at Gallery 51 in North Adams; graphic courtesy WordXWord.

 

 

 

 

Given the range of poetic styles represented, and the challenge presented, the audience is advised to expect the unexpected! Parents are cautioned that this program may contain explicit material.

 

For more information about WordXWord, visit wXw365.org. For more information about Morgan Bulkeley: Nature Culture Clash, BerkshireMuseum.org.

TLC #52: Author Jana Laiz discusses “Weeping under This Same Moon”

Weeping Under This Same Moon, by Jana Laiz is based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives.
Weeping Under This Same Moon, by Jana Laiz is based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives.

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) will welcome award-winning author Jana Laiz, who will discuss her book, “Weeping under This Same Moon,” at the College’s First Year Experience (FYE) Community Reading event, to be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 5, in the MCLA Church Street Center’s Eleanor Furst Roberts Auditorium.

MCLA’s annual fall lectures are free and open to the public. Seating for this FYE Community Reading event will be limited. After the lecture, Laiz will sign copies of her book.

“Weeping under This Same Moon” explores the true story of what happens when two young women from very different cultures connect across difference. Written from the perspectives of both Mei, a Vietnamese refugee, and Hannah, an American high school student, this year’s community reading addresses themes central to MCLA’s liberal arts mission and broader democracy.

Jana Laiz; photo courtesy janalaiz.com.
Jana Laiz; photo courtesy janalaiz.com.

A believer in the power of individuals to make a difference, Laiz is a combination of storyteller, teacher and activist. She was a caseworker at The International Rescue Committee, working in refugee resettlement, and the co-author of “A Free Woman on God’s Earth” The True Story of Elizabeth “Mumbet” Freeman, The Slave Who Won Her Freedom, which recently was named a New York Reads 365 Reading List Selection and has been optioned for the screen.

Laiz lives in the Berkshires, and is a Writer-In-Residence at Herman Melville’s Berkshire home, Arrowhead.

Weeping Under This Same Moon

 

Weeping Under This Same Moon, by Jana Laiz is based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives. Mei is an artist whose life has been disrupted by the Vietnam War. Her anguished parents send her away on a perilous escape during the exodus of thousands of Vietnamese refugees known as “Boat People.” In Mei’s words we learn of the dangers she faces caring for her two younger siblings on a sea journey fraught with hunger, thirst and deprivation, leaving behind everything she loves, to find refuge for her family.

Hannah is an angry seventeen-year-old American high school student. Friendless, neurotic, a social misfit – her passion for writing and the environment only intensify her outcast state. Through Hannah’s voice, we get inside her head, there to discover a gentle soul beneath all the anger and turmoil. When Hannah learns of the plight of the “Boat People,” she is moved to action.

Destiny brings Mei and Hannah together in a celebration of cultures and language, food and friendship, and the ultimate rescue of both young women from their own despair. Weeping Under This Same Moon is a testament to the power of love and the spirit of volunteerism; affirming that doing for others does so much for one’s self…

 

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) is the Commonwealth’s public liberal arts college and a campus of the Massachusetts state university system. MCLA promotes excellence in learning and teaching, innovative scholarship, intellectual creativity, public service, applied knowledge, and active and responsible citizenship. MCLA graduates are prepared to be practical problem solvers and engaged, resilient global citizens.

Save

Save

TLC #51: The Undead StandOut to Protect Obamacare, New Life at Louison House

Editor’s Note: Some of the text portion of the show notes for this episode were taken from officially released material from Louison House.

We speak today with Sherwood Guernsey about the standout planned for 5:00 p.m. in Park Square in Pittsfield to protest the latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act. And we hear from Kathy Keeser, who explained how recent funding news means improvements and repairs that directly impact Louison House’s ability to serve homeless clients.

Fire displaced more than a dozen residents of the Louison House in 2016—funding announced by Director Kathy Keesler is expected to mitigate damage to the physical structure; submitted photo.
Fire displaced more than a dozen residents of the Louison House in 2016—funding announced by Director Kathy Keesler is expected to mitigate damage to the physical structure; submitted photo.

 

Keep Reading

TLC #50: Voices for Recovery with NBCC, but first, the news…

Voices for Recovery: Strengthen Families and Communities
Rally, walk and vigil to raise awareness of opioid addiction and recovery

Voices for Recovery
Voices for Recovery

NORTH ADAMS, MA – On Saturday, September 23, the North Berkshire Community will gather to remember those lost, learn about resources, and celebrate recovery from addiction. The Rx Heroin Work group of the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition along with the City of North Adams are holding the Voices for Recovery Rally, Walk and Vigil from 1-3:30PM. The rally and vigil will be centered at Colegrove Park, with a Recovery Walk through downtown North Adams.

The event will include informational tables representing the recovery services community such as Spectrum Health, the Brien Center, Tapestry, Clean Slate, Narcotics Anonymous, the Berkshire Opioid Abuse Prevention Collaborative, Al Anon, and Josh Bressette Commit to Save a Life. Children’s activities will be on hand from The Family Place and the north Berkshire Systems of Care Committee, along with live music provided by Common Folk Artists Collective. Common Folk will also have a display of art inspired by the topic of addiction and recovery, from the exhibit “To Bless the Space Between Us”.

The theme of the event, “Strengthen Families and Communities” acknowledges that families and the North Berkshire community play a major role in recovery. The impact of addiction on families will be evident at the vigil, in remarks by Pastor Dave Anderson from the North Adams First Baptist Church, and Dawn Windover who will speak about the loss of her son Derek.

The walk, led by Mayor Alcombright, will take place at 2PM through downtown North Adams. The route of the walk will be lined with signs posting information about substance use disorder, recovery services, and celebrating recovery. Walkers will pause for a standout at the intersection of Main Street and Route 8 by City Hall. T-shirts will be available for purchase.

Following the walk, participants will hear from speakers including Collin Woods, former North Adams resident now in recovery and working as a Recovery Coach at Berkshire Transition Network. Dave Risch, North Adams resident and active member of Al Anon as well as the Rx Heroin work group will speak about the role of families in recovery. Mayor Alcombright will conclude the event with words about recovery, and building a recovery community.

A highlight of the event will be the Wall of Remembrance and Recovery created by the volunteer recovery organization, Josh Bressette Commit to Save a Life. The wall will include pictures, images, poems and other statements to remember those lost to addiction. Waterman says she hopes the Wall “creates a compassion for those suffering with loss and for those struggling to recover within the community. Heroin/opioid addiction is not a moral failing, these people featured on the wall had full lives ahead of them, they were loved, cherished and needed.” The wall will also include images to celebrate people in the community in recovery from substance use disorders.

For more information, including how to order a t-shirt for the event, visit www.nbccoalition.org.

Kimball Farms Life Care hosts talk on identity theft, computer fraud on Thursday, Sept. 28

LENOX, MASS. (Sept. 20, 2017) –Kimball Farms Life Care in Lenox will host a presentation on identity theft, the Equifax security breach, computer fraud, and other scams on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 2 p.m. Presenters will include Ann Lynch from the office of the Attorney General of Massachusetts, and Kate Alexander from Berkshire Consumer Services. Refreshments will be served. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to Kimball Farms at 413-637-7000.

Hinds lauds MASSDOT for convening kick-off” meeting of the NYC/Berkshire Rail Working Group

PITTSFIELD – State Senator Adam G. Hinds (D- Pittsfield) announces that MassDOT will convene an organizational, “kick-off” meeting of the NYC/Berkshire Passenger Rail Working Group tomorrow, Thursday, September 21st at 1:00pm at the MassDOT Region 1 Headquarters in Lenox.

The NYC/Berkshire Passenger Rail Working Group, established by Outside Section 137 of the Fiscal Year 2018 budget (Chapter 137 of the Acts of 2017), is an initiative sponsored by Hinds during the Senate budget debate. The proposal was unanimously passed by the Senate, endorsed by the budget conference committee and was signed into law by the Governor.

NORTH ADAMS—Representatives of North Adams Ambulance and Village Ambulance announce agreement for Village Ambulance to merge with North Adams Ambulance pending due diligence.

It is well known that Village Ambulance Service, like many small EMS providers, has been facing increasing financial challenges. In light of this, a working group consisting of representatives of Williams College, the Town of Williamstown, the Williamstown Fire Department and Village Ambulance was formed to evaluate and recommend the best solution that would ensure continued, sustainable emergency medical services to the communities Village serves.

Sameer Gupta comes to MASS MoCA

NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS – Sameer Gupta is a “kinetic, bass-heavy, and tender” percussionist (The Jazz Observer), with roots in the Indian Classical tradition. He’s at MASS MoCA on Saturday, September 30, at 8pm, with a propulsive band featuring Marc Cary (keyboards), Jay Gandhi (bansuri), and Rashaan Carter (bass), for a magical evening of tracks from his new album, A Circle Has No Beginning. Bang on a Can favorite and North Adams resident Todd Reynolds opens the show.

Known as one of the few percussionists simultaneously representing the traditions of American jazz on drum-set and Indian classical music on tabla, musician and composer Gupta did not begin mastering the tabla until well into his jazz career in the early ‘00s. First studying under the guidance of Ustad Zakir Hussain, over the last two decades Gupta has become an accomplished, innovative tabla player and a dedicated disciple of the great tabla maestro Pandit Anindo Chatterjee.

Children’s book author to visit Clark Art Institute

Williamstown, Massachusetts—Join author Maria-Christina Sayn-Wittgenstein Nottebohm (also known as “Puppa”) at the Clark Art Institute on Saturday, October 7 at 11 am as she explores ways to engage children with art. Nottebohm talks about the fun, magical world of exploring Old Master pictures and the methods she discovered in researching her book Old Masters Rock: How to Look at Art with Children. The free talk, held in the Michael Conforti Pavilion, includes a question-and-answer session followed by a book signing.

Empowering children with the skills to look at art enables them to stimulate their imagination and interpret the pictures in their own ways, often seeing things adults don’t notice. According to Nottebohm, enjoying art is all about responding to what the viewer is seeing. Old Masters Rock stimulates children in a playful way so that, together with an adult, they can decode fifty masterpieces of Western art from the last 700 years. The book demonstrates that art is accessible to all—adults and children alike.

600 bicyclists ride through Berkshires at Farm to Fork Fondo

What: Farm to Fork Fondo – Berkshires bicycle event.
600 riders from more than 25 states riding from farm to farm in Berkshire County, MA sampling chef-prepared bites at each farm
When: September 23-24, 2017 weekend

Where: Hancock Shaker Village, 1843 W Housatonic Rd, Pittsfield, MA

Photo/video/media opportunities at Hancock Shaker Village*:
9/23, 5pm: Bicycle Skills Clinic for riders of all abilities on the Brick Dwelling green, taught by the Colavita – Bianchi Professional Women’s Cycling Team
9/23, 7pm: Meet the Farmers Dinner in the historic Shaker dining hall in the Brick Dwelling
9/24, 9am: Farm to Fork Fondo Mass Start – 600 cyclists departing en masse from Hancock Shaker Village at the Brick Dwelling green
9/24, 1 pm: Live Music from Whiskey Treaty Road Show
9/24, 5pm: Volunteer Competition winners announced – More than $5,000 donated to local non-profit organizations

WAM Theatre announces attendees for October’s Berkshire Leadership Summit

LEE, MA – Organizers of the pilot Berkshire Leadership Summit, an event for women aspiring to, or already in, leadership positions in the non-profit theatre, and hosted by WAM Theatre, are excited to announce that the attendees of this event have been selected.

Of the 163 women theatre professionals who applied to participate in the Berkshire Leadership Summit, 75 have been accepted, hailing from 22 U.S. states and four Canadian provinces. This cohort reflects an emphasis the Steering Committee members placed on diversity, accessibility, and intentionality early in the process. Towards this goal, the steering committee members, comprised of Kristen van Ginhoven, Artistic Director of WAM Theatre (Steering Committee Chair); Akiba Abaka, Audience Development Manager at ArtsEmerson; Rachel Fink, Managing Director of Theatre Bay Area; and Shafer Mazow, who currently works at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, went through a rigorous selection process that focused on creating a cohort that balanced career (early/late/mid-career), background (race, sexual identity, geography), and level of leadership experience. The process resulted in an intentional balance of these criteria in an effort to provide the greatest opportunity for personal growth and community-building for each attendee at the summit.

MCLA Gallery 51 to exhibit “Yellow Bowl Project”

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts’ (MCLA) Gallery 51 announces “Freedom from Fear/Yellow Bowl Project,” a solo exhibition by Setsuko Winchester, will open on Thursday, Sept. 28. This exhibition at MCLA Gallery 51 marks the first show of the entire series of photographs created for the project, which documents site-based installations of 120 yellow tea bowls made by Winchester to represent the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese-Americans to 10 internment camps in the American West during World War II.

The public is invited to attend a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. in the 51 Main St. gallery on Thursday, Sept. 28, to celebrate the opening of the “Yellow Bowl Project,” which also was designed to bring attention to a history of Asian and Asian-American racism in the United States.

MCLA offers free global film series this Fall

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) announces the campus will present a Global Film Series this fall, which will feature three documentary films. The first film will be presented on Tuesday, Sept. 26, with a second film to screen in October. The third and final film of the series will be offered in November.

All of the screenings will take place at 6:30 p.m. in Murdock Hall room 218, on the MCLA campus. Each event is free and open to the public.

Save

TLC #49: The fight for $15 minimum wage and paid family leave, plus the risks of making art

Hey Greylock Nation! Today is Wednesday, September 20th 2017, and you’re listening to episode number 48 of the Top Left Corner. I’m your host, Jason Velazquez, and I thank you for tuning in. Today, we speak with Eric Bauer of Massachusetts Jobs with Justice about the push to place two ballot questions in front of the voters this November—a $15 minimum wage and paid family leave. We also heard from Debi Pendell about the upcoming exhibition, “Out on a Limb,” that explores the risk-taking inherent in making art, coming to the Eclipse Mill Gallery September. I found both conversations are truly fascinating, so I hope you enjoy the listen. Keep Reading

TLC #48: BMC Nurses host safe patient care town hall to answer questions

Management at Berkshire Health Systems says the latest offer represents their “best and final,” but BMC Nurses are standing their ground over issues of staffing levels, wages, and benefits/

BMC Nurses stand out at Park Square in Pittsfield, May 6, 2017 to communicate concerns over staffing levels; submitted photo.
BMC Nurses stand out at Park Square in Pittsfield, May 6, 2017 to communicate concerns over staffing levels; submitted photo.

The following information is from a release by the Massachusetts Nurses Association. Berkshire Health Systems declined to be interviewed for this story.

Four community groups are sponsoring a public forum for BMC nurses and residents to discuss safe patient care 

PITTSFIELD, Mass.—A Community Town Hall on Tuesday night will feature registered nurses from Berkshire Medical Center sharing their concerns about patient safety at the hospital and community members discussing their experiences at BMC.

BMC Safe Patient Care Town Hall
sponsored by the Berkshire Brigades, Berkshire Central Labor Council, Indivisible Pittsfield and Massachusetts Jobs with Justice.
Where: First Methodist Church, 55 Fenn Street. in Pittsfield.
When: Tuesday, Sept. 19 from 6 to 8 p.m.

 

“Community members have a right to hear directly from nurses about what is happening inside their hospital,” said RN Alex Neary, Co-Chair of the BMC MNA Bargaining Committee. “This event will give everyone in our community a chance to share their own experience and discuss how we can improve the quality of patient care at BMC.”

“We believe an open and honest public discussion about patient safety at BMC is necessary to move forward in a positive way,” said Brian P. Morrison, President of the Berkshire Central Labor Council. “Berkshire Medical Center was built and paid for by the community and with our tax dollars. The public supports BMC nurses and we urge the hospital to listen to their concerns.”

Nurses have brought their patient safety concerns forward to hospital management in various ways for years, including directly to supervisors, at labor-management meetings and during ongoing negotiations.

BMC RNs have also been documenting this problem using unsafe staffing forms. Between October 1, 2015 and August 21, 2017, nurses completed more than 430 unsafe staffing reports. The reports tell the story time and again: Hospital units short multiple nurses and/or other staff members, patients waiting for hours in the emergency department, patient falls, and critically ill infants with too few nurses to care for them. Hundreds of other incidents have gone undocumented as nurses are typically too busy caring for too many patients to write a report.

Background on Bargaining

BMC nurses are seeking a fair contract that first and foremost protects the quality of patient care. Another key issue is quality and affordable health insurance. BMC has proposed raising by 100 percent how much nurses contribute to individual health insurance premiums. Nurses in BMC’s family health insurance plans already pay 40 to 70 percent more than managers.

Negotiations began in September 2016 and include a federal mediator. More than 25 bargaining sessions have been held. On May 31, nurses rejected the hospital’s “best and final” contract offer by 82 percent. In July, nurses voted 83 percent to authorize a potential one-day strike. The 16-member RN Bargaining Committee has the authority to call for a one-day strike and issue the 10-day strike notice required under federal law.

BMC nurses have also filed three unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board against Berkshire Health, including  threatening to retaliate against nurses if they engage in protected activity and refusing to provide health insurance data necessary for bargaining.

The next negotiation date has been scheduled for September 27.

Save

TLC #47: 1st Berkshire Primary Forum, Perpetual Foreigners, a Creative Consultation

We begin our show with Alexander Davis, who talks about the meetup with candidates for 1st Berkshires district state representative organized by Greylock Together. Julia Dixon discusses the state of the area’s creative economy and her new endeavor as a consultant who can help both artists and organizations with her experience and insights. We talked at length with Setsuko Winchester about the discussion, “Asian-Americans: No More Perpetual Foreigners,” as well the Yellow Bowl Project—her photo/ceramic response to the forced incarceration of Japanese-Americans in concentration camps during World War II.

Setsuko Winchester’s Yellow Bowl Project is a powerful exploration of the unjust, destructive, and pointless incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II; photo by Setsuko Winchester.

 

Greylock Together gives the public a chance to hear from the four Democratic candidates vying for the chance to face off against C

 

Meet Your 1st Berkshire Candidates
Sunday, September 10; 3:00–4:30 p.m.
Williamstown Youth Center
66 School Street, Williamstown, Mass.

 

Alexander Davis discusses the upcoming 1st District state representative candidate forum; submitted photo.
Alexander Davis discusses the upcoming 1st District state representative candidate forum; submitted photo.

Activist group Greylock Together has invited the candidates for the vacant 1st Berkshire seat in the Massachusetts House to come and speak about their candidacy. Everyone is invited to join us and hear each candidate make a brief pitch about how they would be the best to serve. As of right now, we will hear from all four of the declared candidates: John Barrett III, Lisa Blackmer, Stephanie Bosley, and Kevin Towle.

The event will be broadcast on Willinet. We will have three babysitters available if you need someone to watch your mini-activists, too!

Greylock Together has been helping citizens in the region become more actively engaged in politics at the local, state, and national level since November, 2016.
Greylock Together has been helping citizens in the region become more actively engaged in politics at the local, state, and national level since November, 2016.

You can come prepared! Over the course of the past couple of months, Greylock Together has assembled a list of goals we wish to achieve on the local, state, and national level. Each goal is supported by a supermajority of our members. While some are not immediately actionable for a state representative, we still think it’s important that our representative shares our goals and values. We have sent out a survey based on these goals to each candidate. Read their responses now.

 

Alexander Davis is an English teacher and a political activist with Greylock Together. While he’s been a political obsessive for many years, he only really got involved after attending the Women’s March on Washington. Since then, he’s been trying to do what he can. Alexander lives in Williamstown, MA with his wife and baby daughter.

 

Julia Dixon — Creative Economy Specialist

We were really excited to speak with Julia again, especially upon learning that, as a consultant, she’ll be filling a key need in the region. Now, individuals and organizations can tap into all that she has learned about the cultural landscape in a direct, highly personalized fashion. Visit her website to learn more.

Artist and activist Julia Dixon has helped shape the robust creative economy of the Berkshires for nearly a decade; submitted photo.
Artist and activist Julia Dixon has helped shape the robust creative economy of the Berkshires for nearly a decade; submitted photo.

Julia Dixon is an artist, writer, arts administrator, community convener, and creative economy consultant. She is working as a freelance project manager as well as an economic and business consultant based at the Eclipse Mill Artist Lofts in North Adams, Massachusetts, where she lives. Her previous full time positions include Managing Director of Berkshire Creative and Creative Economy Specialist at 1Berkshire. She is the founder and owner of BerkshireFlirt LLC, founder and host of “Creative City” on WMNB-LP 107.1FM, appointed co-founding member and chair of the North Adams Public Arts Commission, and volunteers as a student mentor. She received her BFA from Purchase College in 2005 and MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts in 2014.

Julia sits on numerous community development and cultural committees. She is an appointed founding member and chair of the North Adams Public Arts Commission, member of the North Adams Exchange (NAX) steering group, member of MCLA’s Berkshire Cultural Resource Center advisory board, and was a founding board member of the Makers’ Mill in North Adams. In addition, she is passionate about mentoring high school and college students. She co-taught MCLA’s fall 2016 design thinking capstone class Community Engagement in the Arts with department chair Lisa Donovan, Ph.D., and mentored students participating in MCLA’s inaugural Entrepreneurship & Innovation Challenge in 2017.

Julia is a 2017 honoree of Berkshire Community College’s 40 Under Forty awards, recipient of Americans for the Arts’ 2016 Annual Convention scholarship, and 2014 graduate of the Berkshire Leadership Program and former member of its steering committee.

 

 

Asian-Americans: No More Perpetual Foreigners

The first humans in North American came from the Asian land-mass. Yet somehow Asian-Americans can still be perceived as ‘foreign’. How many years, how many generations must pass before immigrants become ‘American’? Is there a double-standard? Do immigrants from European countries become accepted – and acceptable – sooner than immigrants from other parts of the globe? More laws have been passed in the United States attempting to restrict immigration from Asian countries than from any other part of the world. Japanese-Americans were the only US citizens collectively interned during World War II. And yet Asian-Americans are also paradoxically stereotyped as being a ‘model minority’. What does all this mean?

Join Helen Haerhan Moon, Deepika Shukla, Setsuko Winchester, and K. Scott Wong as they discuss what it means to be Asian-American in the USA and here in the Berkshires.

 

Yellow Bowl Project
Yellow Bowl Project; photo by Setsuko Winchester.

 

During the Second World War, the US Government opened ten concentration camps to incarcerate 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry who had been forcibly removed from the West Coast.

Asian-Americans: No More Perpetual Foreigners
Presented by the City of Pittsfield’s Human Rights Commission
Sunday, September 10, 2017, 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Berkshire Museum
39 South Street, Pittsfield, Mass.
Free

 

Setsuko Winchester

(excerpted from submitted info and her project’s website.)

Setsuko Winchester will be part of the panel Asian Americans: No More Perpetual Foreigners at the Berkshire Museum, Saturday, September 10; photo by Simon-Winchester.
Setsuko Winchester, Artist/Ceramist/Photographer, will be part of the panel “Asian-Americans: No More Perpetual Foreigners” at the Berkshire Museum, Saturday, September 10; photo by Simon-Winchester.

 

Setsuko Sato Winchester is a former NPR journalist and ceramicist. Photographs of her Freedom From Fear/Yellow Bowl Project are currently on exhibit at the FDR Presidential Library & Museum in Hyde Park, New York, through December 31, 2017.

In 2015, I — an American-Japanese, former NPR journalist, ceramicist — began a journey to visit all the remains of these camps, most of them now desolate and lonely ruins. In my studio in Massachusetts I had hand-pinched and glazed 120 bright yellow tea bowls: yellow, to represent the “Yellow Peril,” as Asians were euphemistically referred to at the time, and tea bowls, to represent man’s humanity. My plan was to photograph arrangements of these bowls in each camp, to create a conceptual art project which I called the “Freedom From Fear/Yellow Bowl Project.” The intent of this project is to inform and educate. The hope is to diffuse fear, not spread it.

It was FDR who created the camps — the same FDR who had famously made the iconic Four Freedoms speech. My belief, after much research, is that “Japanese-Americans,” imprisoned in these ten camps wrongly and unjustly, were about as frightening as the tea bowls I planned to display. It is widely agreed today that there was absolutely nothing to fear from them. And it turns out — the irony at the center of my art project — that they had much to fear from the US Government. ​

Hence my project.

 

Helen Moon

Helen Moon is a critical care nurse at Fairview Hospital in Great Barrington. While studying at UMass Boston, she worked and volunteered her time to community programing and advocacy groups affecting Black, Korean and Vietnamese Americans in the greater Boston region. Moon has lead summer camps for Somalian refugee children in Ethiopia, taught English to children in Mexico, served food to homeless veterans in Boston, and has had tea with Muslim women in Egypt. It is because of her love of people from all walks of life, and her continued pursuit of human rights, equal representation, and diversity that Moon is honored to engage in conversations that enrich our understanding of race relations here in Berkshire County.

Deepika Bains Shukla

Deepika Bains Shukla is an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts in Springfield. She prosecutes federal criminal cases involving fraud, public corruption, gun and drug crimes, terrorism, and civil rights crimes. Before coming to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Deepika was a Staff Attorney at the Connecticut Fair Housing Center, a litigator at a small civil rights firm, and an associate at a large law firm in New York.

Setsuko Winchester

Setsuko Winchester, born in New York City of Japanese immigrant parents, worked as a journalist, editor and producer at NPR’s Morning Edition and Talk of the Nation before moving to Western Massachusetts in 2006 to pursue a life-long interest in ceramics and the visual arts. In 2015 those interests of art and journalism converged in an online project called the Freedom From Fear/Yellow Bowl Project. Using her ceramics and photography, her work explores the concept of freedom and what it could mean to different groups at different times in American history through the lens of the mass incarceration of people of Japanese ethnicity in the United States during WWII. The actual tea bowls used in this project were selected by SculptureNow and are installed on the grounds of the Mount, the home of Edith Wharton in Lenox, MA (from June 1- Oct.31, 2017). You can find her website at: http://www.yellowbowlproject.com

K. Scott Wong

K. Scott Wong is the Charles R. Keller Professor of History at Williams College where he teaches a variety of courses in Asian American history, comparative immigration history, history and memory, and the history of race and ethnicity in American culture. He has written numerous articles in journals and anthologies. His most recent monograph is “Americans First”: Chinese Americans and the Second World War (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005.) He is also a former series editor for the Asian American History and Culture series published by Temple University Press.

Main

Densho

Densho’s mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. We offer these irreplaceable firsthand accounts, coupled with historical images and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy, and promote equal justice for all.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

/*
0 $0.00
Go to Top