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Plays

Microdramas: A Program of Short Plays

Williams Theatre Department is excited to present an evening of five short plays, microdramas, directed and performed by Williams students mentored by Robert Baker-White. Short plays have always played an important role in the historical and contemporary repertoires of playwriting, while sometimes being overshadowed by the more conventional three-act play. The students have selected a variety of works intended to challenge and inspire creators and audience alike.

Please be advised: Mature content and representations of aggressive sexual behavior.

The Lesson, one-act play by Eugène Ionesco, a comedic parable of the dangers inherent in indoctrination. The absurd plot of the play concerns a timid professor who uses the meaning he assigns to words to establish tyrannical dominance over an eager female student (britannica.com). The Lesson is directed by Jack Romans ’20, performed by Brandon Hilfer ’20, Mira Sneirson ’22, and Isabel Ouweleen ’21.

In Amy Herzog’s 508, two ex-lovers meet in the apartment they once shared on what would be their fifth anniversary for a settling of accounts. What could be a simple, five-minute exchange devolves into barbs and recriminations. Bridget and Leo can’t resist the pleasure and pain that comes from one last reckoning. Herzog wrestles with the question of what is the correct and authentic way to cope with heartbreak (The Best American Short Plays 2008-2009). 508 is directed by Nadiya Atkinson ’21, performed by Gigi Gamez ’22 and Olaide Adejobi ’19.

Elizabeth Meriwether’s 90 Days centers on Elliott, who’s girlfriend Abby calls to check up on him.  Their short and funny staged phone call wanders from half-truths to awkward miscommunication, showing the tentative first steps towards fixing a relationship, including many tater tots and a failed excuse for a teapot. 90 Days is directed by Nadiya Atkinson ’21, performed by Peter Matsumoto ’21 and Harriet Weldon ’19.

In Springtime, María Irene Fornés focuses on the complications of memory and dependence in the sad tale of Rainbow’s love affair with Greta, a German lab technician. Springtime is directed by Fiona Selmi ’21, performed by Sarah Sutton ’21, Molly Murphy ’19, and Toby Delgado ’21.

In Diana Son’s The Moon Please, a young married couple argues over who is going to work and who will stay with their newborn baby on the morning of September 11th, 2001. A tense new parent squabble takes on an extra dimension when we realize Ciel’s office is at the World Trade Center (playscripts.com). The Moon Please is directed by Jack Romans ’20, performed by Angela Yu ’20 and Austin Franklin ’22.s

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Microdramas: A Program of Short Plays

Williams Theatre Department is excited to present an evening of five short plays, microdramas, directed and performed by Williams students mentored by Robert Baker-White. Short plays have always played an important role in the historical and contemporary repertoires of playwriting, while sometimes being overshadowed by the more conventional three-act play. The students have selected a variety of works intended to challenge and inspire creators and audience alike.

Please be advised: Mature content and representations of aggressive sexual behavior.

The Lesson, one-act play by Eugène Ionesco, a comedic parable of the dangers inherent in indoctrination. The absurd plot of the play concerns a timid professor who uses the meaning he assigns to words to establish tyrannical dominance over an eager female student (britannica.com). The Lesson is directed by Jack Romans ’20, performed by Brandon Hilfer ’20, Mira Sneirson ’22, and Isabel Ouweleen ’21.

In Amy Herzog’s 508, two ex-lovers meet in the apartment they once shared on what would be their fifth anniversary for a settling of accounts. What could be a simple, five-minute exchange devolves into barbs and recriminations. Bridget and Leo can’t resist the pleasure and pain that comes from one last reckoning. Herzog wrestles with the question of what is the correct and authentic way to cope with heartbreak (The Best American Short Plays 2008-2009). 508 is directed by Nadiya Atkinson ’21, performed by Gigi Gamez ’22 and Olaide Adejobi ’19.

Elizabeth Meriwether’s 90 Days centers on Elliott, who’s girlfriend Abby calls to check up on him.  Their short and funny staged phone call wanders from half-truths to awkward miscommunication, showing the tentative first steps towards fixing a relationship, including many tater tots and a failed excuse for a teapot. 90 Days is directed by Nadiya Atkinson ’21, performed by Peter Matsumoto ’21 and Harriet Weldon ’19.

In Springtime, María Irene Fornés focuses on the complications of memory and dependence in the sad tale of Rainbow’s love affair with Greta, a German lab technician. Springtime is directed by Fiona Selmi ’21, performed by Sarah Sutton ’21, Molly Murphy ’19, and Toby Delgado ’21.

In Diana Son’s The Moon Please, a young married couple argues over who is going to work and who will stay with their newborn baby on the morning of September 11th, 2001. A tense new parent squabble takes on an extra dimension when we realize Ciel’s office is at the World Trade Center (playscripts.com). The Moon Please is directed by Jack Romans ’20, performed by Angela Yu ’20 and Austin Franklin ’22.s

 

Will Call #69: Purple Valley Plays—A Festival of New Work for the Stage

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — The Williams Theatre Department will present Purple Valley Plays, original works for the stage written, directed, designed, and performed by Williams students. Back for a third year, Purple Valley Plays continues the Theatre Department’s tradition of incubating new work and cultivating the next generation of theatre artists. Presented in two programs, Purple Valley Plays will premiere works by Terah Ehigiator ’18, Mia Hull ’17, Joseph Messer ’21, Chanel Palmer ’19, and Tom Robertshaw ’19. *

Performances are on Thursday, April 26th to Saturday, April 28th. Program 1 will be in the CenterStage at 7 PM. Program 2 will be in the Adams Memorial Theatre at 8:30 PM. All performances will be located at 1000 Main Street, in Williamstown, MA. Tickets are $3.

“The Theatre Department recognizes that some artistic works are provocative, and may be challenging for audience members—emotionally, intellectually, and personally.  We wish to alert our patrons to the following specific content.”

 

Program One (Adams Memorial Theatre)

River Spirits by Terah Ehigiator ’18, directed by Jack Romans ’20. Emmett lives freely in paradise until the appearance of a strange new boy alters him forever. With playfulness and sincerity, this play explores tensions of boyhood, friendship, and (dis)belief.

contains artistic representations of racialized violence and self-harm.

Phaedra / Hippolytus / by Mia Hull ’17, directed by Tom Robertshaw ’19. A woman, in love with her husband, falls in love with his son. Clean lines and floors, stifled, enraged, undone.

contains artistic representations of suicide.

Program Two (CenterStage)

Majesty in the Middle Realm by Chanel Palmer ’19, directed by Caroline Fairweather ’20. A fast-paced exploration of connection, belonging, displacement, and infinity. A young woman’s quest for family and for peace in a world of in-betweens turns out to extend well beyond her wildest dreams.

alludes to racialized violence and police brutality.

What if We Loved with our Radiated Bodies? by Joseph Messer ’21, directed by Fiona Selmi ’21. Three infected lovers attempt to find themselves, but as their environment falls apart, words fall apart, movement falls apart, and people fall apart as well.

contains graphic sexual language.

Chastens and Hastens by Tom Robertshaw ’19, directed by Liam Ouweleen ’19. Thanksgiving/family/generations/breach/a dongle/butterball/ritual hunt?

references appropriation of indigenous cultures, and ignorance about sexual and gendered orientations.

The Theatre Department works to develop in each student an understanding of theatre that is both broad and deep. Through creative expression and critical study, we challenge students to engage both contemporary and historical modes of performance. Theatre students make artworks through design, acting, directing, and dramaturgy. They are encouraged to experiment, to risk, and to make bold choices. Working collaboratively with faculty and guest artists, students integrate intellectual, physical, and emotional responses into an array of live performances each academic year.

For tickets, visit the Williams ’62 Center Box Office Tues-Sat, 1-5 pm or call (413) 597-2425. For more information, please visit http://62center.williams.edu

 

* This article was created, in whole or in part, using submitted officially released information.

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