Greylock NationLocal Weather Alerts
There are currently no active weather alerts.

History

Brunch with Santa

Here’s a quintessential holiday activity. Enjoy a delicious buffet, sit on Santa’s lap, and have fun with other seasonal activities such as crafts, music, story time, and visiting our animals in the Round Stone Barn. Tasty foods include eggs (from our chickens), pastries, and even mac ‘n cheese. Fun for the young and young at heart.
TICKETS Adults $45/$40.50 members; Children 12 and younger $25/$22.50 members

Candlelit Evening

Experience the magic of an enchanted evening at a Shaker village filled with New England traditions, live music, storytelling, festive foods, candlelight, and caroling. The landscape takes on a magical appearance, decorated in greenery and illuminated by twinkling lights. Stroll by lantern light to the historic 1910 Barn for live music. Meander into the Round Stone Barn to see our young calves (bring your cameras for the cutest photo opportunities), not to mention goats, lambs, pigs, rams, donkeys, and chickens. Wander into the Brick Dwelling for a holiday reading, followed by appetizers, cocktails, and punch for the kids. End by luminaria caroling through the historic village.
TICKETS $45/$40.50 members; Children $25/$22.50 members

Wreath ‘N Sip

Join us for a relaxing evening as you design and craft a fragrant seasonal wreath to take home. Grab a drink, take a seat, and we’ll guide you step-by-step in using natural greens and cones to make a wreath to celebrate the season and enjoy its aroma. Perfect to do with friends! Registration includes materials, snacks, and wine. Reservations required.
TICKETS $90/$81 members

Thanksgiving on the Farm

Hancock Shaker Village is the ideal setting to spend time with family and friends over the holiday weekend. The grounds are open for you to enjoy. Visit our heritage-breed turkeys in the barnyard and say hello to other animals in the barn. Then create your own crafty barnyard animal in the Discovery Barn to take home. Meander along the Farm & Forest Trail or hike the Shaker Trail. Learn about the Shakers and see their beautifully designed objects in the 19th-century Brick Dwelling anytime, or on tours at 11am and 2pm. Visit our Round Stone Barn at your leisure or join a guided tour at noon. Then head to the Laundry & Machine Shop, witness the power of the turbine, and learn about Shaker sustainability. Woodworking and blacksmithing demos throughout the day. Shop for the holidays in Shaker Mercantile for handcrafted goods you can’t find elsewhere. Warm up with spiced local cider and autumn lunch at Seeds Market Cafe.

Included In Admission/Free To Members

FIND OUT MORE.

Thanksgiving on the Farm

Hancock Shaker Village is the ideal setting to spend time with family and friends over the holiday weekend. The grounds are open for you to enjoy. Visit our heritage-breed turkeys in the barnyard and say hello to other animals in the barn. Then create your own crafty barnyard animal in the Discovery Barn to take home. Meander along the Farm & Forest Trail or hike the Shaker Trail. Learn about the Shakers and see their beautifully designed objects in the 19th-century Brick Dwelling anytime, or on tours at 11am and 2pm. Visit our Round Stone Barn at your leisure or join a guided tour at noon. Then head to the Laundry & Machine Shop, witness the power of the turbine, and learn about Shaker sustainability. Woodworking and blacksmithing demos throughout the day. Shop for the holidays in Shaker Mercantile for handcrafted goods you can’t find elsewhere. Warm up with spiced local cider and autumn lunch at Seeds Market Cafe.

Included In Admission/Free To Members

FIND OUT MORE.

Thanksgiving on the Farm

Hancock Shaker Village is the ideal setting to spend time with family and friends over the holiday weekend. The grounds are open for you to enjoy. Visit our heritage-breed turkeys in the barnyard and say hello to other animals in the barn. Then create your own crafty barnyard animal in the Discovery Barn to take home. Meander along the Farm & Forest Trail or hike the Shaker Trail. Learn about the Shakers and see their beautifully designed objects in the 19th-century Brick Dwelling anytime, or on tours at 11am and 2pm. Visit our Round Stone Barn at your leisure or join a guided tour at noon. Then head to the Laundry & Machine Shop, witness the power of the turbine, and learn about Shaker sustainability. Woodworking and blacksmithing demos throughout the day. Shop for the holidays in Shaker Mercantile for handcrafted goods you can’t find elsewhere. Warm up with spiced local cider and autumn lunch at Seeds Market Cafe.

Included In Admission/Free To Members

FIND OUT MORE.

Timothy Snyder to Visit Williams to Discuss Links between Environment and Holocaust

"Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning" urges us to pay close attention to growing ecological panic and increasingly widespread governmental destabilization; image courtesy Penguin Random House
"Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning" urges us to pay close attention to growing ecological panic and increasingly widespread governmental destabilization; image courtesy Penguin Random House
Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;" the link between scarcity and Genocide (photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org)
Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of “Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;” photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass.—Timothy Snyder, Bird White Housum Professor of History at Yale University, will present a talk titled “Black Earth: The Ecological Politics of the Holocaust”­­­­­ as part of the year’s Confronting Climate Change Initiative at Williams College on Monday, Sept.19, at 7 p.m. in Griffin Hall, room 3. This event is free and open to the public.

🔊 LISTEN to our interview with Dr. Timothy Snyder,

 

which aired just after the release of

 

Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

 

and read more about his work.

Snyder’s most recent book, Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (Tim Duggan Books, 2015), presents a new explanation of the Holocaust that highlights the role of environmental concerns and demagogic exploitation of those fears. He traces back the beginnings of the ideology that allowed the Holocaust to happen and devotes much of the book to examining the few people who aided Jews without institutional support. He concludes that due to growing current preoccupations with food and water, along with political unrest, today’s society is coming to resemble that of the early twentieth century period that saw the rise of the Nazi ideology. His talk will look at the structural causes for how Hitler’s ideology could and can function, and how today we might face similar risks due to climate change and state collapse.

Snyder was born in southwestern Ohio. He received his B.A. from Brown University and later his doctorate from University of Oxford. He has written five books and co-edited two, and has published essays in numerous publications including the Journal of Cold War Studies, the International Herald Tribune, New York Review of Books, the Wall Street Journal and the Times Literary Supplement. His book Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (Basic Books, 2010) has earned him 12 awards including the Emerson Prize in the Humanities, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Leipzig Award for European Understanding and the Hannah Arendt Prize.

This event is sponsored by the Program in Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Center for Environmental Studies.

Save

Save

Save

Plenty #3 — Timothy Snyder Warns of Next Genocide

Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;" photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org
Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;" photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org

Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;" photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org
Timothy Snyder, Housum Professor of History at Yale, and author of “Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning;”
photo by Ine Gundersveen, courtesy timothysnyder.org

We spoke with Timothy Snyder about his recent work examining two necessary conditions for the Holocaust: disintegration of the state and ecological panic. The Yale history professor explains the connections between perceived resource scarcity, the dissolution of political order, and the assignment of blame to vulnerable foes. The result in World War II, of course, was a genocide that claimed over six million lives. Today, with far more pressing ecological worries and transcontinental geopolitical instability, a genocide could begin in any number of regions. Indeed, from the chaos of failed or failing states, a refugee and migrant crisis as urgent as any in history is underway right now. How long can it be before humanity responds in troubling, familiar ways?

Keep Reading

/*
0 $0.00
Go to Top