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Greylock Nation Almanac

First, we’d better have a look at those gauges…

If you set the time machine correctly, today should be Saturday, January 28, 2020.

TODAY Rain, mainly after 2pm. High near 37. Breezy, with an east wind around 23 mph, with gusts as high as 36 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.
TONIGHT — Rain before 1am, then a chance of snow showers between 1am and 4am. Low around 30. Breezy, with an east wind 16 to 21 mph becoming light and variable. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.
MAÑANA — A chance of snow showers before 1pm, then a chance of rain and snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 39. West wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Recent Weather and Climate News

From Forbes
January 10, 2019

There Is No Climate Slowdown: Earth’s Oceans Are Heating Up Faster Than Previously Reported

The ocean is heating up faster than previously thought, according to new research out this week, and that might help explain the recent spate of historic hurricanes and decline in a number of marine species.
Read the entire story at Forbes.

From Forbes
Dec 28, 2018

Climate Change Is Already Helping To Drive Up Homelessness

We already can reasonably expect that climate change will increase gentrification in the future, as people with money who get pushed by rising seas on the coasts seek replacement housing further inland.

But climate change is already causing housing problems. It helps increase homelessness.

Read the entire story at Forbes.

From Scientific American
June 6, 2018

A Wyoming Reservation Shows the New Face of Drought

A climate-driven warping of the water cycle is forcing a re-think of water management practices

The traditional measure of drought has been an absence of rainfall. Much later, [Mike] Hobbins stumbled across a way to measure the early stages of droughts by calculating what he calls the “evaporative demand,” or the “growing thirst of the atmosphere.” He found a set of weather data, spanning 38 years, giving him the basic creators of dryness: the wind, air temperature, humidity and incoming solar radiation. That allowed him to identify developing droughts on weather maps without needing to know local soil moisture conditions.
Read the entire story at Scientific American.

From the journal Science

Trump White House quietly cancels NASA research verifying greenhouse gas cuts

You can’t manage what you don’t measure. The adage is especially relevant for climate-warming greenhouse gases, which are crucial to manage—and challenging to measure. In recent years, though, satellite and aircraft instruments have begun monitoring carbon dioxide and methane remotely, and NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS), a $10-million-a-year research line, has helped stitch together observations of sources and sinks into high-resolution models of the planet’s flows of carbon. Now, President Donald Trump’s administration has quietly killed the CMS, Science has learned.
Read the entire story at Science.

Freshwater feedback loops accelerating Antarctic glacial melt

In a study released April 18 in the journal, Science Advances, “Freshening by glacial meltwater enhances melting of ice shelves and reduces formation of Antarctic Bottom Water,” climate scientists Alessandro Silvano et al. reveal that the melting of Antarctic glaciers is creating a feedback loop that is driving ice loss faster, much faster, than originally thought possible.

Our results suggest that increased glacial meltwater input in a warming climate will both reduce Antarctic Bottom Water formation and trigger increased mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, with consequences for the global overturning circulation and sea level rise.

A good summation of the issue can be found at Common Dreams. In 2016, former NASA climate scientist James Hansen, on the potential for such feedback loops, noted “These feedbacks raise questions about how soon we will pass points of no return in which we lock in consequences that cannot be reversed on any time scale that people care about. Consequences include sea level rise of several meters, which we estimate could occur this century or at latest next century if fossil fuel emissions continue at a high level. That would mean loss of all coastal cities, most of the world’s large cities and all their history.”

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